Volume 104, Issue 8 p. 4214-4225
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

The influence of carbon on the microstructure and wear resistance of alumina

Rachel Marder

Rachel Marder

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

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Priyadarshini Ghosh

Priyadarshini Ghosh

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

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Ivar Reimanis

Ivar Reimanis

Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA

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Wayne D. Kaplan

Corresponding Author

Wayne D. Kaplan

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

Correspondence

Wayne D. Kaplan, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel.

Email: [email protected]

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First published: 01 April 2021
Citations: 6

Ivar Reimanis and Wayne D. Kaplan are Member of the American Ceramic Society.

Abstract

The influence of carbon as a dopant on grain growth and wear resistance of polycrystalline alumina was evaluated. Carbon was introduced into alumina by sintering in a carbon-rich environment (graphite furnace under flowing He), and/or by residual carbon from organic binders used during the green body consolidation process. Samples were sintered at 1600°C for 2 h. Doping alumina with carbon resulted in a reduced grain size after sintering, correlated to solute-drag, and graphite particle-drag for high concentrations of carbon (~3 wt.%). The material response to abrasive wear was quantified by measuring the sample area cut for a defined time using a diamond wafering saw, as a function of grain size and carbon content. Sintering alumina with carbon resulted in a significant increase in wear resistance, as a result of the reduced grain size.