Volume 75, Issue 5 p. 1223-1228

Theoretical Process Development for Freeze-Drying Spray-Frozen Aerosols

Patrick J. McGrath

Patrick J. McGrath

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195

Send correspondence to this author at the Dow Chemical Co., P.O. Box 1398, Pittsburg, CA 94565.

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Richard M. Laine

Richard M. Laine

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195

Member, American Ceramic Society.

Current address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136.

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First published: May 1992
Citations: 12

L. Klein–contributing editor

Presented at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society, Indianapolis, IN, April 25, 1989 (Symposium on Colloidal Processing and Forming of Ceramics, Paper No. 14-SIV-89).

Member, American Ceramic Society.

Current address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136.

Abstract

Freeze-dry processing was investigated as a means of producing homogeneous multicomponent preceramic powders. A general procedure was developed for synthesizing homogeneous multicomponent powders by spray freezing and subsequent freeze-drying. Uniform particle morphology and high chemical homogeneity were used as criteria for powder quality. Methods of controlling powder morphology and sources of chemical segregation within the powder processing scheme were determined and classical transport phenomena models were constructed in order to define operating parameters required to meet powder quality specifications.